CRITICAL METHODOLOGY OF MEDIA LITERACY

A Kantian Analysis

  • Eun Ha Kim Konkuk University
Keywords: Center for Media Literacy, Critical Literacy, Kant’s Reflective Judgment, Potter’s Media Literacy, Reflective Literacy, Reflective Thinking, Viewpoint Formation Method

Abstract

The objective of this study is to analyze critical methodology of media literacy presented by Center for Media Literacy (CML) and James Potter, and derive the meaning of reflection connoted in it. This study proposes three principles of reflection based on Kant’s concept of reflective judgment: logical plurality of information, ethical value of practice, and possibility of realizing common good. A reflective literacy based on this basic framework is ultimately directed to the thought process of establishing ourselves a coherent and universal principle about arbitrary and variable information. This study complements the individualized and strategized method of information interpretation by restoring the reflective meaning and principles that is excluded from CML’s and Porter’s media literacy model.

Author Biography

Eun Ha Kim, Konkuk University

Dr Eun Ha Kim is Assistant Professor at Sang-Huh College of Konkuk University. Her main field of study is Kant’s philosophy and media philosophy.

References

Patricia Aufderheide and Charles M. Firestone, “Media Literacy: A Report of the National Leadership Conference on Media Literacy,” Aspen Institute, Queenstown

Maryland: Communications and Society Program, 1993.

Immanuel Kant, Critique of the Power of Judgment, ed. Paul Guyer and Allen W. Wood, trans. Paul Guyer and Eric Matthews, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2008, 67.

Mastermann, a pioneer of media literacy, emphasized that information users can raise diverse questions about the attributes of the world represented by media bias, values, omissions, authors, points of view, lifestyle, power, etc. Len Mastermann, Teaching the Media, Abingdon, Oxford: Comedia Publishing Group, 1985. Tessa Jolls and Elizabeth Thoman, “Literacy for the 21st Century,” An Overview & Orientation Guide to Media Literacy Education," Los Angeles: Center for Media Literacy, 2008, 14.

David Buckingham, Media Education, trans. Sun Jung Ki and Ami Kim, Seoul: Jn Book, 2004, 72.

James Potter, Media Literacy, trans. Dae Hee Kim and Yoon Kyung Lim, Seoul: Sotong, 2016.

Kant, Critique of the Power of Judgment: Kant’s Complete Works, ed. The Royal Prussian Academy of Sciences (and its successor), Vol. 5, Berlin: Berlin Printing and Publishing by Georg Reimer, 1913, 179(XXVI-XXVII).

Kant, Critique of Practical Reason: Kant’s Complete Works, ed. The Royal Prussian Academy of Sciences (and its successor), Vol. 5, Berlin: Berlin Printing and Publishing by Georg Reimer, 1913, 31.

Kant, Groundwork for the Metaphysic of Morals: Kant’s Complete Works, ed. The Royal Prussian Academy of Sciences (and its successor), Vol. 4, Berlin: Berlin Printing and Publishing by Georg Reimer, 1911, 429.

Judith Williamson, “How Does Girl Number Twenty Understand Ideology?” Screen Education 40, 2 (1981), 80-87.

Published
2019-06-29
How to Cite
Kim, E. H. (2019). CRITICAL METHODOLOGY OF MEDIA LITERACY. Journal of Dharma, 44(2), 155-176. Retrieved from http://dvkjournals.in/index.php/jd/article/view/209