ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE: HOW CLOSE WILL IT COME TO BEING “MADE IN THE IMAGE AND LIKENESS OF GOD?”

  • Patrick Dolan KU Leuven
Keywords: Artificial Intelligence, Christ in Creation, Dominion and Domination, Christ’s Hidden Years, Image of God, Freedom, Mutuality and Respect

Abstract

Because our modern electronic devices seem to do so many things, questions about the capabilities and dangers of this Artificial Intelligence (AI) arise.  Will they compete against and possibly become independent enough to become a threat to humans?  A look at the development of (AI) might help us understand what it is today—as well as its likely achievements—and its risks—as it continues to progress. In comparison, understanding what human life is, as something more than just part of the food chain, has been pursued by philosophers and psychologists (as well as theologians) over the years.  Adding to those insights from an examination of the incarnation of Christ, particularly his hidden life as part of the Holy Family, combined with a parallel examination of the Image and Likeness of God in its Genesis 1:26 context of dominion, reveals an emphasis on the concepts of respect and mutuality. Examining this way of living out divine love, as it operated in Christ’s hidden life, helps us clarify the difference between human intelligence and artificial intelligence—and why artificial intelligence needs human control.

Author Biography

Patrick Dolan, KU Leuven

Fr Patrick Dolan, PhD, STD earned his doctorate in Inorganic Chemistry from Indiana University, USA. He also holds a doctorate in Moral theology from the Pontifical University of St Thomas in Rome (Angelicum). He taught organic chemistry and mathematics at Spalding University in Louisville, KY, and general chemistry at St Catherine College in Springfield, KY, all while pastoring in a series of parishes in the Louisville Archdiocese and serving as a chaplain in the US army.  He has lectured on Just War issues to the US National Security Agency in 2002 and has given retreats for clergy and laity (and provided sacraments) on 6 continents, composed music and published 8 poems as well as a 4-Book of Catholic Fantasy Series “Traces of Magic.” He was a fellow at Harvard. His major works include, “Land, the Key to Diocesan Priestly Spirituality”(1995), “Archetypes of Spirituality” (1996), “Multiculturalism, Science and the Eucharist” (2003), all published in Emmanuel magazine. He is currently a visiting scholar at KU Leuven, Belgium. Email: mucl@hotmail.com

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Published
2020-11-09
How to Cite
Dolan, P. (2020). ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE: HOW CLOSE WILL IT COME TO BEING “MADE IN THE IMAGE AND LIKENESS OF GOD?”. Asian Horizons, 14(3), 686-698. Retrieved from http://dvkjournals.in/index.php/ah/article/view/3202